Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Red fruit crumble cake

The other day M brought home some blackberries and raspberries, and although he and I liked them, the children thought they were a bit tart. And so I did the only wise thing I know to do and turned the berries into a cake -  a delicious red fruit crumble cake, to be precise. I won't be making it too often otherwise I will turn into a cake myself, as I can barely seem to stop cutting slices from it and sliding them into my mouth. Very small slices, yes, but if you do so ten times within, say, a span of twelve hours, it amounts to about half a cake in one day. And although this cake is relatively low in fat, it would still be ridiculous to eat half a cake IN ONE DAY.

Instead of scoffing everything myself, I would really like to offer a square to all you readers out there, as well as folks who not only read, but have also started following Notes from Delft. And, of course, to everyone who has, up to now, left a trail of inspiring comments. Thank you so much - your attention, kindness and readership mean the world to me.

I could write an ode on the result of the crumble cake (its melt-in-the-mouth soft and dewy crumb, its subtle and delicate sweetness, the tart freshness of the fruit), but will give you the recipe instead. 




Red Fruit Crumble Cake
adapted from Smitten Kitchen, where it was adapted from Maida Heatter's Book of Great Desserts, by Maida Heatter

for the cake:
240g spelt flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
0,5 teaspoon fine sea salt
55g butter, softened
150g coconut palm sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
350g of blackberries and raspberries, clean and dry
100ml milk
brownie tin (approx. 30cm by 21cm )

for the crumble topping:
5 tablespoons spelt flour
80g raw cane sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
55g butter, cubed
pinch of fine sea salt

for the cake:
  • preheat the oven 190 degrees Celsius
  • in a bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and salt
  • put butter and sugar into a large bowl, then, using a hand mixer, beat until light and fluffy
  • add eggs and vanilla, and beat some more
  • beat in about a third of the dry ingredients, followed by half of the milk
  •  repeat the process until the dry ingredients and milk have all been used
  • carefully fold in the berries
  • scrape the mixture into the prepared pan, and gently flatten 
for the crumble topping:
  • throw all the ingredients into a bowl
  • rub butter into the dry ingredients until you are left with something that resembles coarse bread crumbs
  • crumble the mixture on top of the cake mixture in the tin
  • bake 35-40 minutes (mine was perfect in 35mins) 
  • dust with icing sugar, if desired
  • yields 12 generous squares 

18 comments:

  1. That does sound rather scrumptious!
    It's been a real pleasure finding your blog Isabelle.

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    1. Thanks so much, Jessica; I always love your visits!

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  2. That is one delicious sounding cake. Might have to have a go! I'll blog my results (eventually!!)

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    1. If you do have a go, I would love to hear how you got on!

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  3. I always convince myself that if cake has fruit in, then it's fine to eat as much as I want as it's part of my five a day................

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    1. Haha - you're just like me: if it's got fruit, it's must be okay!

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  4. It looks delicious and I will soon have lots of blackberries to use. Think I'll have to use them for a cake!

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    1. Blackberry crumbles, blackberry muffins... I never seem to tire of them. Nigel Slater has a great section on them too in Tender (part two).

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  5. In my world, it is perfectly ok to eat half a cake in one day. As long as it is not every day that is! I have blogged about eating jam doughnuts before, I have a soft spot for them and they seem to only come in packs of 5.
    I am intrigued at your use of spelt flour in a cake, I only ever use this for bread. I might give your recipe a try, tomorrow (fasting today).

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    1. Spelt is wonderful for biscuits and cakes - I always use it because I have a wheat intolerance. Spelt is much softer on the system; at least for me it is. Good luck fasting!

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  6. I also try not to bake cakes too often, I have the same problem as you... In the evening I start wondering where all the cake went... (And since there's only me and my husband in the house, and he is not very fond of sweet....)
    Spelt is perfect for all kinds of baking, isn't it ! I'm a fan too - much easier to digest !

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  7. Oo it looks very scrummy no wonder you couldn't stop eating it

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  8. Looks delicious! I'm normally not a fruit cake type of person, but this may be an exception.
    ~Sophia
    http://plaidismyfavouritecolour.blogspot.com/

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  9. I like fresh berries in cakes as it makes them really moist. It looks delicious.

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  10. Looks delish! I bake (and eat) a lot of cakes, but have never tried spelt flour, I really should X

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  11. That does sound scrummy, might have to give that a go with some of the berries I seemed to have amassed this year! Thank you for sharing :)

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  12. A delightful recipe I must give that a go.

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  13. Any cake with fruit or berries in is good as far as I am concerned so I can see how you could eat a lot of it if you weren't careful! xx

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